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By Tom Demerly and Jan Mack for tomdemerly.com

An elderly man and woman driving eastbound on Hines Drive under Telegraph Road in Dearborn Heights were rescued from serious injury or worse after a crash and vehicle fire on Wednesday, June 14, at approximately 5:15 PM by passing cyclists Nate Nalder, 41, of Dearborn, Michigan and friend Dave Taylor.

Nalder, an experienced road cyclist who frequently trains along Hines Drive, told us, “Dave Taylor and I were riding down Hines, going west. Just after we passed under Telegraph we saw a white, late model Ford Fusion driving across the lawn on the other side of the walking path. It was moving fast across the grass, maybe 45-50 MPH. It came back toward Hines, we heard a loud ‘boom’ and the car rolled three times.”

An unidentified male was driving the vehicle with a female in the passenger seat. The occupants of the vehicle were described as “elderly”. According to witnesses at the scene of the accident, a medical incident may have affected the driver. The cause of the accident has not been officially determined.

When cyclist Nate Nalder saw the accident happen he turned back toward the place where the vehicle came to rest. “I hurried and checked the traffic real quick and rode back to the car and dropped my bike and ran there to the driver’s side and pounded on the window.”

Nalder was attempting rescue from the driver’s side door, but heard a voice from the passenger side shout, “Help me, I’m trapped, get me out of here.”

The airbags in the vehicle had deployed and the interior filling with smoke. The vehicle began burning shortly after it came to rest.

“I said, ‘We got to get them out of here!’ said Nalder, directing rescue efforts of bystanders.  “I did not know the extent of his injuries so I asked him to undo his own seatbelt to kind of assess his condition. Myself and two others guys helped him out and walked him over and set him down.”

As the fire spread, and without regard for his personal safety, Nalder returned to the burning vehicle to recover the female passenger and move her to a safe distance. Another cyclist had arrived on the scene to assist Nate Nalder and Dave Taylor in the rescue. A passing motorist had stopped on the scene and phoned 911 for assistance.

It is possible that, because of the age of the vehicle occupants and the possible medical condition of the driver, the swift selfless actions of Nate Nalder and Dave Taylor at the scene prevented more serious injury from the fire or fatalities as a result of the crash and fire.

According to the account Nalder heard from the passenger of the vehicle, who was transported from the scene by emergency personnel, the driver lost the ability to control the vehicle, possibly due to a medical incident. The passenger was able to grab the steering wheel but could not control the pedals because the driver’s legs were in the way. The passenger steered the vehicle off the road away from other cars but could not control the speed of the vehicle. It struck a pole and rolled several times.

Cyclist Nate Nalder, 41, of Dearborn, Michigan and friend Dave Taylor rescued motorists from a burning vehicle on Hines Drive on Wednesday.

When we asked cyclist Nate Nalder what made him decide to respond by pulling the victims from the burning car and how he had learned to respond to an accident situation he told us:

“When I was younger in high school I was riding in the back seat of a Jeep and came over a hill and accidentally hit a friend who was walking across the street. I just jumped out and helped. It was the automatic thing to do I guess. I grew up being a Boy Scout, doing a lot of lifeguarding classes and learning CPR. Just learning how to take care of a person when they are hurt. Something just said, ‘Get over there and do what you can to help because no one else was’ I was the first person to that car I guess.”

The quick, selfless actions of Nate Nalder and Dave Taylor at the accident scene almost certainly prevented further injury to the two vehicle occupants once the car began burning.

By Tom Demerly for tomdemerly.com

 

He appeared like night smoke. Silent and sudden.

And like smoke he disappeared without a sound.

Someone’s black cat walked through our yard. It sometimes jumps on the windowsills. Nothing unusual, just a pet cat on his rounds when its owner let it outside.

Or so I thought.

After seeing the same black cat every day, whom we began calling “The Mysterious Cat”, I started paying attention to him. I had no idea I would discover an incredible, mysterious wilderness right outside my window. It’s a complex hierarchy of alpha predators, finite territories, deadly stalking and a ruthless food chain. It’s no different than the plains of Africa where majestic lions hunt in prides or the jungles of the Suriname Forest in India where Bengal tigers stalk their prey like solitary snipers. In fact, it may be even more complex because, whether we realize it or not, we are part of the food chain.

Five things helped me understand The Mysterious Cat. I watched a BBC documentary called “The Secret Life of the Cat”. It followed the hidden behavior of indoor/outdoor pet cats and revealed details about their range, territorial activity and habits. I recently saw the award-winning film, “Kedi”, about feral cats living in Istanbul, Turkey and the local populations’ reverent relationship with them since ancient times. I was reading author(s) Erin Hunter’s entertaining fiction book series, The Warriors. Erin Hunter, who is actually a group of six different authors, creates fictional feline characters divided into different categories of cats. Some are pet cats, called “kittypets”, others are solitary outdoor cats called “loners” and “rogues”. They have complex fictional societies and elaborate adventures. I was also casually keeping track of local pet cats’ behavior in the neighborhood. I would see the same cats on someone’s porch, notice their schedules and territorial behavior. And then finally, the fifth thing that got my attention:

One night The Mysterious Cat made an extraordinary visit. It stalked into our run-down outdoor back porch. A very large, solid black cat with a thick coat and sturdy legs. He skirted the crumbling brick planter wall, checked over his shoulder twice, then silently climbed in one stride up to where my girlfriend had planted catnip plants. He munched catnip for a second, and then it got weird…

Our indoor cat, Vice-Admiral Malcom Fredrick Davis III (Vice-Admiral for short), stepped up on the indoor porch windowsill. The Mysterious Cat left the catnip plant and slowly walked over to the outdoor window where the Vice-Admiral was. Glass separated the two cats. I anticipated hissing and raised fur, and then one cat would make a hasty retreat. But I was wrong.

The Vice-Admiral, a domesticated indoor “kittypet”, was intensely interested in the Mysterious Cat. He was not afraid of the Mysterious Cat, not aggressive toward him. It was as though he was fascinated, as a person might be seeing an exotic new species. The Vice-Admiral leaned forward toward the glass. The Mysterious cat climbed onto the windowsill outside. Only a thin windowpane separated the two cats. In a gesture that could only be interpreted as a form of inter-species détente, the Vice-Admiral assumed the exact same posture as the Mysterious Cat, mimicking him, side turned to him, pressing against the inside of the glass as the Mysterious Cat leaned against the outside in mirror image. It’s possible the cats could feel the warmth of each others’ bodies through the glass, the vibration from their nervous purring. It made no sense. I expected territorial behavior, meowing, hissing, arched backs. What I saw was bizarre behavior I had never seen between two domestic cats.

Because I wasn’t watching two domestic cats.

 

The Vice-Admiral maintains surveillance.

I wanted to know who owned the Mysterious Cat, who cared for it, where it lived and what its name is- whether it is a boy or a girl. I posted a photo of the Mysterious Cat from my smartphone on the local neighborhood web forum NextdoorNeighborhood.com. “Does Anyone Know This Awesome Black Cat?” What I learned was stunning.

The Mysterious Cat is not a domestic cat. It is a feral cat.

Feral cats are behaviorally hyper-evolved cats  that appear identical to domestic cats. They live in a vast grey area between wild cats like bobcats, lynxes, panthers and cougars and stray domestic cats. They are very distant from an indoor domestic cat in behavior. They are also different than a stray domestic cat as I learned without realizing it a year earlier.

Feral cats are the alpha predators of suburbia. They are highly adapted and exhibit incredible intelligence, reasoning, and a remarkable ability to learn complex concepts quickly. They stalk, kill and enforce a ruthless command over a clearly defined territory. They sit at the top of a natural suburban food chain few people even know exists. Most of what they eat is prey they kill in their nightly hunting trips. These suburban wildcats help reduce rodent populations and control pests. They are, in a very real sense, the panthers on our porches. Feral cats seldom “convert” from being feral to becoming domestic, although this does happen occasionally. Particularly in the ruins of outer Detroit where vast areas of abandoned houses and overgrown lawns turned mini-forests are the perfect environment for a growing population of feral cats, these remarkable semi-wild cats are on the rise.

One night, after dark, I spotted the Mysterious Cat outside. The wind was east to west and the cat was headed east. My sound and scent would be masked. I followed him to wherever he was going. At first he appeared remarkably casual, walking in shadow near the center of the sidewalk at a businesslike pace. I did not know it, but I was being drawn into an ambush. At each corner he would stop and listen, look, before crossing the street. How did a cat learn to use sidewalks and crosswalks, and obey stop signs? I followed carefully, moving from concealed position to concealed position nearly a block behind him. Remarkably he did something I had learned as a member of an elite special operations unit in the military. He changed direction, circled back and checked behind him to be sure he was not being followed. And he saw me. This cat had just used tactics taught in the most sophisticated combat schools in the military. And he just used them to perform counter-surveillance on me. If Osama bin Laden had behaved like this cat, we’d still be looking for him. I was stunned. This was no one’s pet. This was a sophisticated predator.

A woman on the NextDoorNeighborhood.com forum replied to my inquiry about the Mysterious Cat. Cyndi Parrely lives on the corner two city blocks east of our house. Her garage door is always slightly open, about a foot. There is a stone statue of a cat in her garden. Visible just under her door is a small cat enclosure. The lair of the Mysterious Cat.

“I do not know if it’s a boy or girl. Can’t really get close enough. I began feeding her/him about a year ago. Very gentle but keeps her distance. Never makes a sound.”

Cyndi has defaulted to referring to the Mysterious Cat as “her”. No one knows its true gender or age. Or where it came from. But Cyndi is a kind and generous person who has made a home in her garage for the Mysterious Cat. She has entered the behavioral and food chain of the feral cat, and performs a vital function to its survival.

The Mysterious Cat would only accept food and some limited outdoor shelter from her. No petting sessions, little physical contact. “I touch her when she comes up to eat and she is fine with that. Doesn’t run away.”

Suddenly a number of mysterious puzzle pieces about local cat behavior revealed themselves. Two cats who live at the south end of the block near the entrance to the park never leave their yard. The Mysterious Cat does not permit it. He limits their territory to their own yard, chasing them back to their house if they venture outside their clearly defined territory. He allows them their yard, but no more. And his policing of the boundaries is vigilant and rough.

Young Chester, our adopted stray who lived outside much of the time before we adopted him, had three deep puncture wounds on his left ear when we got him a year or so ago. When Chester first appeared in the neighborhood right before we adopted him the Mysterious Cat had savagely enforced his territorial rule on young Chester. Even though he was no more than a kitten, Chester was a threat, a competitor for food in the Mysterious Cat’s domain. There was no room for Chester. The Mysterious Cat tried to kill him. Luckily, young Chester escaped with only minor wounds and we adopted him permanently as an indoor cat. Now he is safe.

For months Chester would sit in the window and meow a longing, urgent meow in the early morning, the time when the Mysterious Cat was most frequently seen returning to his lair. The week after the Vice-Admiral held his meeting on the back porch with the Mysterious Cat, Chester stopped meowing. He has not done it since. It’s been a week. It is as though some silent communication was passed on that Chester is off the “kill” list; the Vice-Admiral has brokered a peace treaty. Call me a crazy cat person, but this behavior is real.

Cyndi told me, “She [or he] stares at my cat through the glass door. They are both outside together at times and get along. No fights.” Cyndi told me about the Mysterious Cat’s behavior in her yard. “I try and coax her but to no avail.”

Perhaps the most remarkable part of this story is the role we humans play in the Mysterious Cat’s life. Something in us, some desire to spread kindness and safety, is leveraged by the Mysterious Cat. It is arguable who ultimately commands the neighborhood, the humans who live in the houses here, or the Mysterious Cat that can bend us to its will without making a sound.

By Tom Demerly for tomdemerly.com

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In a brutal week for traditional big-box U.S retailers, Sears Holding announced the closure of 108 Kmart and 42 Sears locations in 40 states. Overall 150 large department stores are being closed by the formerly popular department store brand. Additionally, department store giant Macy’s announced the closure of 68 stores across the U.S.

As with any large shift in business there is likely no single reason for the closures. They are the result of a complex amalgam of factors that have aligned to degrade the appeal of big department stores to retail customers.

What can the bicycle retail industry learn from the big-box closures?

If you insist on a singular narrative to the “big-box bust” it is failure to adapt.

Big box retail stores are essentially a time capsule of retail since the post World War II consumer boom era. They have not changed significantly since then. Items are stocked by category in displays on a large sales floor. Displays highlight featured products. Shoppers can see, feel and touch items before they buy them. And while this seems like a logical way to present and sell consumer goods it fails to acknowledge a simple theme: Most other factors in retail consumption have changed.

When Sears, JC Penney and Macy’s were founded Costco, Sam’s Club, online shopping, smart phones, Amazon.com “One-Click” and e-Bay did not exist. These new alternatives to traditional retail have exerted a kind of slow, painful “death by a thousand cuts” on traditional department store retail. Add the “reset” affect of the U.S. recession and structural changes in age demographics and you have a brutal conspiracy of factors working against traditional retail.

Retail has become increasingly polarized, with consumers gravitating toward either end of the retail spectrum. They buy from massive online and warehouse stores for commodity items like appliances, most daily apparel and food staples. They buy from small well-branded niche retailers for discretionary purchases like fashion apparel, luxury goods, specialty recreational equipment and items that help define their lifestyle.

The lesson for the bike industry is simple; sell, stock, display and market differently than old school department stores. Look at what they have done, and do the opposite.

Here are a few specifics for bike retailers: Avoid excessive program buying that makes any one brand dominant in your store making it feel like a generic “brand store”.

Bike brand takeover of independent bike dealers has been an emerging trend because of attractive pricing incentives for dealers, financing of inventory and the marketing strength that the big brands offer the small shops. These things sound great to a small specialty retailer. Bike brands have sold small independent dealers on the idea of “competing with the big boxes” by aligning with a big bike brand for marketing, financing inventory and even point of sale systems. The problem with that logic is that small specialty retailers don’t need to, and cannot, compete with the big box retailers. Instead, they need to create and maintain an entirely new identity unto themselves. They need to create their own niche, and that takes original thinking and acceptance of risk.

If there is a singular lesson it is: If the big box retailers are doing something, then the small independent bike shops should invent another approach. Small specialty bike shops should capitalize on their small size by remaining nimble with inventory, rapidly adaptive to trends and constantly changing their merchandising to reflect their position at the leading edge of the sport. They also need to be honest about the structural elements of their business. Are they located in an area where cyclists live, ride and shop? Does the local population use specialty retailers? Are they near other niche-category specialty retailers?

Finally, the small specialty bike shop needs to exploit the great equalizer of modern commerce, the Internet. This doesn’t necessarily mean having a shopping cart experience online, but it does mean presenting products that are unique and branding themselves by communicating a unique voice that reinforces expertise, candor and authority.

It’s possible for the small bicycle retailer to succeed, and some continue to, but the rules have changed and continue to change quickly enough that doing the same old thing will earn a retailer the same destiny as once-great retail giants Sears, Macy’s and JC Penney.

 

 

By Tom Demerly for tomdemerly.com

CRASH

Nine adult cyclists, both male and female, were struck by a blue Chevrolet pick-up truck at approximately 6:36 PM on Tuesday, June 7 near Markin Glen Park outside Kalamazoo, Michigan. Five of the victims were declared dead at the scene according to reports from WOOD TV 8 Live.

In a press conference held at 11:00 PM Kalamazoo County Prosecutor Jeff Gedding told reporters the cyclists were “All adults, both male and female, and were riding together in a group”. According to witnesses the cyclists were riding north bound on the right side of the road and were struck from the rear. An unidentified witness told a news reporter “We didn’t see anybody walk away”.

Kalamazoo County Prosecutor Jeff Gedding delivers press conference at 11:00 PM on Tuesday, June 7 about the accident.

Kalamazoo County Prosecutor Jeff Gedding delivers press conference at 11:00 PM on Tuesday, June 7 about the crash.

Prosecutor Gedding also told reporters that in the minutes leading up to the collision with cyclists there were at least three calls made to local law enforcement agencies to report erratic or dangerous driving from the blue Chevrolet pick-up truck involved in the crash.

At 6:08 PM the area public safety agency received a phone call about the blue pick-up truck driving erratically, followed by a call at 6:13 to the local sheriff’s department and a third call to township police at 6:21 prior to the accident report at 6:36 PM. There was no on-going pursuit of the suspect vehicle at the time of the accident according to police.

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Photos shared on Wednesday, June 8 show bikes of the crash victims.

The blue pick-up truck was recovered by police at the scene after the driver had abandoned it. The driver/suspect was apprehended by police near the accident scene and remains in custody.

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Kalamazoo County Prosecutor Jeff Gedding told reporters there was very little information he could provide about the accident pending a review of the official report as early as Thursday. Gedding said the Michigan State Police would conduct “A reconstruction of the accident” based on the report.

Names of the victims and of the driver involved will not be released by police until deemed appropriate by law enforcement.

Heather Walker of News 8 contributed to this Report.